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Thursday, September 3

  1. page Reeve edited Type {file:///Users/cb3042/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/moz-screenshot.png} {file:///Users/cb3…
    Type {file:///Users/cb3042/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/moz-screenshot.png} {file:///Users/cb3042/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/moz-screenshot-1.png} {Reeve.gif}
    Original Text:
    The reeve he was a slender, choleric man
    Who shaved his beard as close as razor can.
    His hair was cut round even with his ears;
    His top was tonsured like a pulpiteer's.
    Long were his legs, and they were very lean,
    And like a staff, with no calf to be seen.
    Well could he manage granary and bin;
    No auditor could ever on him win.
    He could foretell, by drought and by the rain,
    The yielding of his seed and of his grain.
    His lord's sheep and his oxen and his dairy,
    His swine and horses, all his stores, his poultry,
    Were wholly
    in this steward's managing;
    And, by agreement, he'd made reckoning
    Since his young lord of age was twenty years;
    Yet no man ever found him in arrears.
    There was no agent, hind, or herd who'd cheat
    But he knew well his cunning and deceit;
    They were afraid of him as of
    the contentdeath.
    His cottage was a good one, on a heath;
    By green trees shaded with this dwelling-place.
    Much better than his lord could he purchase.
    Right rich he was in his own private right,
    Seeing he'd pleased his lord, by day or night,
    By giving him, or lending, of his goods,
    And so got thanked- but yet got coats and hoods.
    In youth he'd learned a good trade, and had been
    A carpenter, as fine as could be seen.
    This steward sat a horse that well could trot,
    And was all dapple-grey, and was named Scot.
    A long surcoat of blue did he parade,
    And at his side he bore a rusty blade.
    Of Norfolk was this reeve of whom I tell,
    From near a town that men call Badeswell.
    Bundled he was like friar from chin to croup,
    And ever he rode hindmost of our troop.
    Paraphrase:
    The Reeve was old and easily angered and irritated man. He was in charge of his master's land and crops and was very good at it. He had been with he same master for a long time. Reeve supervised his masters farm and knew all the sort of tricks people tried to pull. Balliffs, serfs, and herdsmen would not even try ripping the Reeve off because he was tough and saw it coming. He was feared by many because they could not get anything past him. Received some wealth from learning the craft of carpentry at a young age, very skilled.
    Commentary:
    Reeve was very skilled in his profession to the point of being intimating to others. His work was almost flawless and people were even scared
    of your page here.him. He was mean but a good worker and got stuff done. Chaucer liked him because he is a hardworking man that followed good moral values and stood up for himself against injustices.
    (view changes)
    7:42 am
  2. file Reeve.gif uploaded
    7:42 am
  3. page Woman from Bath edited So was a somewhat deaf, who could make blankets better then entire known for sewing. So when this …
    So was a somewhat deaf, who could make blankets better then entire known for sewing. So when this woman was in church she liked to be at the front, toward the alters, and if a younger woman dared to stroll in front of her she would become enraged. Her headkerchief was made of very finely woven fabrics, seemed to weigh lots, and she wore it only on sundays, suggesting she wishes to be very well dressed for church. She wore scarlet hosing, which shows her status, because in this day the brighter the color the more expensive it was, and she also had new shoes. She was homely looking, and had rosy cheeks. She had had five husbands, as well as many "escorts" in her youth.
    She had been to many places, including Jerusalem three times. She had gap teeth, and she wore nice clothes, along with a hat the size of a small shield. She was sort of portly, she had large hips, and she sat on a horse. She was very pleasurable in company of others, but was still "promiscuous".
    {http://www.unc.edu/depts/chaucer/zatta/wife.jpg}

    (view changes)
    7:38 am
  4. page Manciple edited {manciple.jpg} The Manciple came from the inner temple-- one of the 4 inns of the court. He was i…
    {manciple.jpg} The Manciple came from the inner temple-- one of the 4 inns of the court. He was in charge of catering, purchasing, and storing food. He seems persistant but greedy to get the best food. He is illiterate and has more than 30 masters--all of his masters were wealthy, and good with law. He remained debt free as long as he didn't make any of the noble mad. Even though he is illiterate, he is still clever because soemtimes his masters would come to him for legal matters.
    We think The Manciple is a good man, clever despite his illiteracy.

    (view changes)
    7:37 am
  5. page Miller edited {The-Miller-From-Chaucer-s--Canterbury-Tales---1878-Henry-Stacy-Marks-215745.jpg} He was short…
    {The-Miller-From-Chaucer-s--Canterbury-Tales---1878-Henry-Stacy-Marks-215745.jpg}
    He was short and stout, very broad boned. Also very strong. He wore a blue hood and a white coat. He had red hair, a red beard and a wart on his nose. He carried a sword. He told filthy stories and was a master at stealing grain. He liked to play bagpipes. {webkit-fake-url://30609B9A-E2B6-4A09-80E5-77721FC6B8CD/The-Miller-From-Chaucer-s--Canterbury-Tales---1878-Henry-Stacy-Marks-215745.jpg} The-Miller-From-Chaucer-s--Canterbury-Tales---1878-Henry-Stacy-Marks-215745.jpg
    (view changes)
    7:35 am
  6. page Parson edited He is a rich man, that gave to the poor & the church offering. He required little to satisfy h…
    He is a rich man, that gave to the poor & the church offering. He required little to satisfy his own needs, he wasn't a greedy man.
    He was a noble example to the people around him. The true example a priest should give is one of cleanness, how the people should live.
    He didn't pay anyone to preform his duties. He was never too proud and never showed contempt. He drew men to Heaven and their Savior.

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    7:34 am
  7. page Summoner edited summoner ... of them. He would talk and shout like he's crazy. A SOMONOUR was ther with us in…
    summoner
    ...
    of them. He would talk and shout like he's crazy.
    A SOMONOUR was ther with us in that place,
    That hadde a fyr-reed cherubynnes face,
    (view changes)
    7:33 am
  8. page Manciple edited The {manciple.jpg} The Manciple came ... He is illeterate illiterate and has ... he is il…
    The {manciple.jpg} The Manciple came
    ...
    He is illeterateilliterate and has
    ...
    he is illeterate,illiterate, he is
    ...
    legal matters.
    We think The Manciple is a good man, clever despite his illiteracy.

    (view changes)
    7:33 am
  9. page Miller edited ... a white coat coat. He had ... play bagpipes. {webkit-fake-url://1ADBB0C4-94D0-4ED6-BA70…
    ...
    a white coatcoat. He had
    ...
    play bagpipes.
    {webkit-fake-url://1ADBB0C4-94D0-4ED6-BA70-21D84BED4A63/The-Miller-From-Chaucer-s--Canterbury-Tales---1878-Henry-Stacy-Marks-215745.jpg}
    {webkit-fake-url://30609B9A-E2B6-4A09-80E5-77721FC6B8CD/The-Miller-From-Chaucer-s--Canterbury-Tales---1878-Henry-Stacy-Marks-215745.jpg} The-Miller-From-Chaucer-s--Canterbury-Tales---1878-Henry-Stacy-Marks-215745.jpg
    (view changes)
    7:32 am

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